Texas military families know what it’s like to be without their partners due to long deployments or other military requirements. Now, with the continual cycle of repeated deployments, military families are experiencing strains on their marriage and the divorce rate among military families is climbing. Although research previously suggested that deployed soldiers tend to have stronger marriages, recent figures place the current military divorce rate at 3.7 percent.

These numbers overshadow the current civilian divorce rate of 3.5 percent. Sadly, the divorce rate among military families is the highest it has been since 1999. With multiple deployments, some soldiers are able to balance their military duties and married life. However, many cannot. While the military is attempting to reduce the length of deployments, marriages can still become an unavoidable casualty during war time.

The Army is aware of the statistics and the stress deployments can impose on a marriage. However, when the nation is embroiled in war, the military is unable to promise a solider will not be deployed.

In addition to deployments, the military is unable to prevent soldiers from seeing the worst of war. Soldiers may suffer head injuries and many are at risk of suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome.

Some Texas soldiers return home after multiple and lengthy deployments and find that their marriage has changed. They may realize that they have grown apart from their partner or simply want different things. Although no one anticipates that their marriage will end in divorce, it may be the best option for some couples.

Source: The Tacoma News Tribune, “Military families also pay price for repeated tours of duty,” Adam Ashton, May 14, 2012