We have often discussed how important it is for victims of domestic violence to take a stand in a way that help them remain safe. Remaining in an abusive relationship can lead to serious injuries or even death. Sadly, some people find that the pattern of abuse doesn’t necessarily stop when someone takes a stand against the abuse. The case of a woman who was recently killed in Texas shows just how serious domestic violence is.

The couple was married in 1987 when he was 18 and she was 17. They had two children, but trouble was brewing in the relationship. In 1993, the woman filed for a protective order against the man. She didn’t follow through with it that time. Two weeks after filing, she dropped the request.

Three years later, the couple separated. She filed for a protective order but didn’t drop it that time. Within eight months, the man violated that order five times. He was threatening to kill her. Once she filed for divorce, he threatened her again. Just before the divorce was finalized in 1997, the man threatened her again.

Both the man and the woman remarried other people, but both were divorced. The man was incarcerated in 1999 in connection with an aggravated assault with a deadly weapon charge. That charge was because of a shooting at a drag strip.

At some point after his release on parole in 2008, the couple got back together. The same pattern of domestic violence resurfaced, and the woman left the man. She moved out of state.

She returned to Texas for her grandson’s birthday in November. While she was in her car outside of her ex-husband’s house, he shot her in the head.

Protective orders can help to keep domestic violence victims safe, but the victim has to leave the abuser. Anyone who is having issues with domestic abuse should work to understand what protections are available. Taking a stand against abuse by using the available avenues of assistance can help victims stay safe.

Source: DallasNews, “Deadly Affection: Tosha Pruitt struggled for years to escape domestic violence” Diane Jennings, Dec. 07, 2014