Going to court to request a protective order against your ex-spouse is so frightening. You are in a dangerous situation because this person is following you and making threats. What does the Texas Family Code have to say about domestic violence?

Any adult member of the family or household can file an application for a protective order so that you and your kids can feel a bit safer. This type of order can be filed if you are in a dating relationship that turns violent or even if you are still married and feel unsafe with this person in the home with you and your children.

If it is your children that you fear for, you can file a protective order to keep your spouse or ex-spouse from being near them in any way. Have you suffered from family violence? This may be the time to talk to an attorney who can guide you in getting a protective order in place that is binding and will stand up in court if necessary. The Department of Family and Protective Services is who can also help. But if there is a backlog, your protective order may be not so forthcoming if you go this route. Your best bet is with an attorney who knows how to do this and do it right.

The protective order has to be filed in the county in which you live, the abuser lives or in the county in which the abuse occurred. When you are filing, you have to ensure that you put your full name and the county of residence on the order. You also have to be sure and put the county of the person who committed the violence. You need to specify what type of relationship you two had at the time of the abuse.

Can you begin to see that it may be a good idea for an attorney to be involved? You want this done quickly and correctly. Having a legal professional at hand can help.

Source: Texas Constitution and Statutes, “Texas Family Code Sec. 82,” accessed Dec. 11, 2015