Your Guide to Child Custody Modification

There’s nothing easy about divorce. It can be a battlefield, both financially and emotionally. And often it’s the children who experience the most trauma as a result of the family turmoil.

When a child custody arrangement is part of a divorce settlement, it’s nearly impossible to account for every variable. Lives change, major decisions have to be made, and thus child custody modification often must be taken into consideration.

Let’s take a look at a few reasons why you might need to consider a child custody modification after your divorce has been finalized.  

When Your Ex Violates the Visitation Schedule

The child custody visitation schedule is an important legal document that needs to be taken seriously. This document exists for a reason. It ensures that both parties remain on the same page in regard to visitation rights, and helps to eliminate confusion.

When one parent decides to break the visitation agreement, it might become necessary to make a motion to modify custody.

When One Parent Relocates

It’s not at all unusual for a parent to physically relocate while a child is young. This can occur for a number of reasons. Sometimes a parent will relocate because of their employment situation, and they must move due to their job. Or perhaps they remarry and the new spouse lives out of the area.

These types of scenarios are obviously an inconvenience and require both parents to be as flexible as possible. After all, the child’s wellbeing should always remain the top priority.

When a parent chooses to move across the country, or even just a few hours away, a modification will likely be necessary, and the court will have to assess the details and issue a decision based on what is best for the child.

When There is a Threat to Your Child’s Safety

When a child’s safety is threatened by one parent or someone in that parent’s household, the court will need to take immediate action. If you believe that your child is in danger, do not hesitate to notify an attorney and request for the child custody agreement to be modified so that your child is safe.

It’s vital to protect children from any situation where there is domestic violence, neglect, or when there is evidence of drug or alcohol abuse.

When One Parent Dies

When a custodial parent dies, the court will need to determine who will assume custody of the child. Typically the court grants custody to the non-custodial child, though in some cases a third-party will assume custody.

The Importance of Child Custody Modification

Never forget that divorce is hard on kids. One of the purposes of the child custody schedule is to keep the child’s life as stable as possible.

This can often be a challenge. Especially when you consider that life is often unpredictable. Child custody modification allows flexibility as things change. Because let’s face it, our lives rarely remain the same.

Contact An Experienced Child Custody Lawyer Today

The important thing is to make sure that your child remains happy and healthy.  If you have questions about Child Custody Modification, please contact family lawyers at Scott M. Brown and Associates.

You can reach us by calling 281-612-8241 or completing our online form. We have offices in Angleton, Webster/Clear Lake, and Pearland.

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